Evan Leonard

MS, MMS, PA-C

Dr. Leonard is a Doctor of Medical Science and a clinical anatomist. He has practiced in both internal and emergency medicine and has published several, peer-reviewed articles and a medical book chapter.

Heroin is one of the most dangerous and addictive illicit drugs being used and abused in the U.S. today.

Along with prescription opioid pain medications and the synthetic opioid fentanyl, it still remains a major factor in the ongoing “U.S. Opioid Epidemic.”

Sadly, many people begin using heroin with little idea about how highly addictive the drug is. Before long, they are actively and regularly using the drug, and rapidly become addicted – medically known as heroin or opioid use disorder (HUD/OUD).

Here, we look at heroin from several different angles:

  • The drug’s addictive side effects
  • How heroin affects the brain
  • The physical and mental damage it can do
  • Heroin’s role in the U.S. opioid epidemic
  • What it’s like to be addicted to heroin, and
  • How professional opioid use disorder (OUD) treatment is the only feasible way of successfully finding a long-term, sustainable recovery

Continue reading to learn more about heroin and its alarming potential for addiction.

Heroin, Use or abuse, addiction and overdose risks. from 1999 to 2018 nearly 450000 people died from overdoses involving an opioid, in 2018 were involved in 69.9 percent of all drug overdose deaths. 1 in 5 patients given ten day opioid prescriptions become long term users. Some common symptoms of an opioid or heroin overdose include loss of consciousness, unresponsive to outside stimulus, breathing is very slow and shallow, erratic, body is very limp, vomiting, fingernails and lips turn blue or purplish black and eratic or slow pulse
Heroin, Use or abuse, addiction and overdose risks. from 1999 to 2018 nearly 450000 people died from overdoses involving an opioid, in 2018 were involved in 69.9 percent of all drug overdose deaths. 1 in 5 patients given ten day opioid prescriptions become long term users. Some common symptoms of an opioid or heroin overdose include loss of consciousness, unresponsive to outside stimulus, breathing is very slow and shallow, erratic, body is very limp, vomiting, fingernails and lips turn blue or purplish black and eratic or slow pulse

What is Heroin?

Heroin is a powerful, rapidly-acting and highly addictive drug made from morphine, a natural substance taken from the seed pod of various opium poppy plants grown around the world.

It is classified as an opiate or opioid drug, and is medically described as an opioid analgesic, and a mu-opioid receptor agonist. It’s chemical name is diacetylmorphine.

It can be either a white (the purest form) or a brown powder, or a black, sticky substance known as “black tar heroin.”

Huge opium poppy fields for both the legal production of pharmaceutical morphine and the illegal manufacture of heroin can be found in:

  • Southeast Asia

Thailand / Laos / Myanmar

  • Southwest Asia

Afghanistan / Pakistan

  • Central & South America

Mexico / Bolivia / Colombia

Photo of heroin being extracted through a syringe

Heroin is illegally sold on U.S. streets by criminal drug dealers, or purchased online through the dark web. Obviously, buying heroin in these ways means users have little or no idea what the purchased substance contains, or its strength.

This leaves many users constantly at risk of a potentially fatal overdose.

WARNING #1: Heroin is often “cut” (mixed) with strychnine or other poisons

  • Many of these various additives do not fully dissolve, which can clog the blood vessels that lead to the lungs, kidneys or brain, risking the infection and physical damage of vital organs.

WARNING #2: Fentanyl Contamination 

  • The exceptionally potent synthetic opioid fentanyl or one of its similar chemical analogs is being mixed into virtually every other illicit drug available on the streets of America, including heroin, methamphetamine, cocaine, counterfeit prescription pills, and MDMA (ecstasy).

Heroin: Street Names

According to the U.S. Drug Enforcement Agency (DEA), it has the following street names:

  • Big H
  • Skag
  • Thunder
  • H
  • Horse
  • Hell Dust
  • Junk
  • Smack
  • Nose drops

Heroin is classed as a Schedule I substance in the U.S. under the Controlled Substances Act, meaning that it has:

  1. A high potential for abuse
  2. No currently accepted medical use in treatment in the United States, and
  3. A lack of accepted safety for use under medical supervision.”

How is Heroin Used?

Heroin users either inject, sniff, snort, or smoke heroin, and some users mix their heroin with crack cocaine, a dangerous practice known as “speedballing.”

It affects the brain rapidly because it effectively binds to our natural opioid receptors [as described in detail below: How Does Heroin Affect the Brain?].

This results in a flood of the brain’s natural “feel-good” chemical dopamine into the brain’s “reward center.”

Heroin users experience an intense and euphoric high when using the drug, feeling both elated and completely relaxed, with no pain.

WE'VE HELPED HUNDREDS OF PEOPLE TO GET OFF OF OPIOIDS

START TODAY

One phone call can set you on the road to recovery & help you get your life back on track


Can You Get Addicted to Heroin After One Use?

Although heroin is extremely potent, highly addictive and produces this intense and powerful feeling of euphoria, it is very doubtful that anyone who uses it for the very first time will become instantly addicted or “hooked” on the drug.

However, heroin can leave first-time users with a psychological craving to try the drug again. With repeated use, an actual addiction to heroin or the development of opioid use disorder (OUD) will normally take several weeks to occur.

The History of Heroin in the U.S.

The use of opium and morphine dates back more than 5,000 years. However, it was only relatively recently in 1805 when French pharmacist Friedrich Sertürner discovered how to chemically isolate morphine.

From then on, the drug was widely used to treat pain and even treat opium addiction – long before it became clear morphine was, itself, highly addictive.

In fact, morphine was used during the American Civil War to treat severe pain in injured soldiers.

Photo of Charles Romney Alder

In 1874, English chemist Charles Romney Alder Wright began experimenting with morphine and, by accident, created heroin from mixing morphine with various acids. He called the resulting chemical diacetylmorphine – now known as heroin.

Soon after its creation, heroin became a popular and widely used medicine in the U.S.; specifically, it was used for:

  • Treating moderate to severe pain
  • Treating coughs and colds as a form of cough medicine
  • Relieving pain after childbirth
  • Treating morphine addiction
  • Anesthesia for surgical patients

Bayer, the pharmaceutical company, branded diacetylmorphine as heroin in 1898, and marketed the drug as a “non-addictive pain medication” – a move that has resounding similarities with the actions of U.S. pharmaceutical companies prior to the current opioid epidemic.

Although high rates of heroin addiction were being reported in the 1920s, it continued to be frequently prescribed to both children and adults for various ailments.

Heroin finally became illegal in the U.S. in 1924 after the federal government realized how addictive it was, and it remains an illicit Schedule I substance to this day.

 

What Causes Opioid Addiction & Why is it So Tough to Combat?

TED-Ed with Mike Davis

The full transcription of this TED-Ed video is available here.

In the 1980s and 90s, pharmaceutical companies began to market opioid painkillers aggressively, while actively downplaying their addictive potential. The number of prescriptions skyrocketed, and so did cases of addiction, beginning a crisis that continues today.

What makes opioids so addictive?

Mike Davis explains what we can do to reverse the skyrocketing rates of addiction and overdose.

 

What are opioids? they are medications derived from the poppy plant for treatment of chronic, moderate and severe pain, opioids are the most abused of all prescription drugs, they often act as a gateway to heroin addiction, studies project that opioids may kill 500000 Americans in the next decade
What are opioids? they are medications derived from the poppy plant for treatment of chronic, moderate and severe pain, opioids are the most abused of all prescription drugs, they often act as a gateway to heroin addiction, studies project that opioids may kill 500000 Americans in the next decade

Heroin: Side Effects

 

Whether it’s because of a recreational drug user’s curiosity, peer pressure, opioid pain prescriptions no longer being fillable, mental health disorders, behavioral issues, or something else entirely, the euphoric experience of a user’s first hit of heroin stays with them, possibly leading to further use, and then, ultimately, addiction.

 

So what are the actual side effects of heroin use and how does it affect the brain so dramatically?

 

Typically, heroin users experience:

 

  • Intense and euphoric “high”
  • Decrease in pain levels
  • Feelings of elation, happiness and relaxation.
  • Excessive fatigue
  • Changes in their mental perceptions
 

How Does Heroin Affect the Brain?

 

Heroin is described as a mu-opioid receptor agonist. This means it effectively and rapidly binds to the natural opioid receptors in the brain, and activates them.

 

Normally, our own natural neurotransmitters bind to these receptors in order to control pain, regulate hormones, and keep us feeling good.

 

Photo of the brain structure in terms of its functionality for the human being

 

However, when the mu-opioid receptors are activated by a powerful drug like heroin, a huge amount of dopamine is released.
It is this rapid rush of dopamine that creates the feeling of intense euphoria felt by heroin users.

 

U.S. Opiod epidemic, facts and stats. 86 percent of heroin users report having used prescription opioids like oxycodone and vicodin prior to using heroin. Close to 80 percent of people who abuse heroin state that they have used prescription opioids first. In the two thousands, 75 percent stated that their first experience with drug abuse was with a prescribed opioid drug
U.S. Opiod epidemic, facts and stats. 86 percent of heroin users report having used prescription opioids like oxycodone and vicodin prior to using heroin. Close to 80 percent of people who abuse heroin state that they have used prescription opioids first. In the two thousands, 75 percent stated that their first experience with drug abuse was with a prescribed opioid drug

The U.S. Opioid Epidemic

 

The ongoing national opioid epidemic continues to take the lives of Americans at a frightening rate – around 190 opioid-related deaths per day, and the rate continues to worsen.

With the growing use of synthetic opioids, like fentanyl (a drug 50 times stronger than morphine), it will be years before an end to the crisis is in sight.

 

Duragesic, anstral and actiq are chemical names for fentanyl. Fentanyl is 50 to 100 times stronger than morphine, in 2016 The Drug Enforcement Agency called fentanyl a treat to public health and safety
Duragesic, anstral and actiq are chemical names for fentanyl. Fentanyl is 50 to 100 times stronger than morphine, in 2016 The Drug Enforcement Agency called fentanyl a treat to public health and safety

 

The opioid epidemic was originally caused by the actions of the U.S. pharmaceutical industry, who assured family physicians across the nation that new opioid medications for treating pain were safe to prescribe, and, importantly, not addictive.

As a result, the medical community – everyone’s tried and trusted family doctor – began prescribing them to patients at insanely high rates.

Before long, it became clear that these medications could indeed be highly addictive, and opioid overdose rates began to increase.

 

 

Opioid Epidemic: The Medical Industry Created a Public Health Crisis

Dr. Chris Johnson, MD | TEDx Talks

 

As an emergency room physician, Dr. Chris Johnson has worked on the front lines of the opioid epidemic. He argues that the epidemic is not an accident, and that the medical industry and its system of incentives have, in fact, created this crisis at the expense of effective, compassionate medicine driven by science.

 

He is a nationally recognized expert on the opioid epidemic, and has spoken throughout the country on this topic to medical and non-medical audiences alike, and brings an urgent message on the need to reform a medical industry that has prioritized business interests over patient safety.

 

U.S. Opioid Epidemic: Facts & Stats

 

In 2017, an estimated 1.7 million Americans suffered from opioid use disorder (OUD) related to prescription opioid medications, with 652,000 suffering specifically from heroin use disorder.

 

On October 26, 2017, the opioid epidemic was finally and formally declared a national public health emergency by the U.S. Department of Health & Human Services, at the request of the White House.

 

In 2019, nearly 50,000 people died in the U.S. from opioid-related overdoses, through the use, abuse and subsequent addiction to prescription pain medications, fentanyl, heroin, and other opioids.

 

Additionally, according to the National Vital Statistics System, part of the Center for Disease Control & Prevention (CDC), heroin was involved in nearly a fifth of all drug overdose deaths (19.8%) during the year.

 

This is the highest number of overdose deaths ever recorded in a 12-month period. We are seeing an increase in drug consumption, difficulty in accessing life-saving treatments for substance use disorders, and a tragic rise in overdose deaths.

Dr. Nora Volkow, Director, National Institute on Drug Abuse

 

In 2020, the opioid death rate rose to nearly 70,000 – around three-quarters (74.7%) of all drug overdose deaths (93,331) during the year, and an increase of nearly 30% from overall drug mortality in 2019.

 

 

Latest Update: The CDC’s latest provisional data reports that the percentage rate for fatal drug overdoses is still rising, now standing at nearly 31%.

 

Economic Burden. The total economic burden of prescription opioid misuse alone in the U.S. according to the CDC represents 78.5 billion dollars per year among cost of health care, lost economic productivity, addiction or out treatment and criminal justice. With the growing use of synthetic opioids, like fentanyl, a drug 50 times stronger than morphine, it will be years before an end to the crisis is in sight
Economic Burden. The total economic burden of prescription opioid misuse alone in the U.S. according to the CDC represents 78.5 billion dollars per year among cost of health care, lost economic productivity, addiction or out treatment and criminal justice. With the growing use of synthetic opioids, like fentanyl, a drug 50 times stronger than morphine, it will be years before an end to the crisis is in sight

Heroin: The Cheap Alternative to Prescription Opioids?

 

Medical research over the last decade has suggested that the misuse of opioid prescriptions by some people may open the door to heroin use later in their lives – such is the devastating impact of opioid use disorder.

 

The transition is equally dramatic – from prescription medications to an illicit Schedule I street drug, and from family physicians to backstreet criminal drug dealers.

 

According to the NIDA, here’s a summary of known data:

 

  • 21-29% of patients prescribed opioids for chronic pain misuse them
  • Between 8-12% of people using an opioid for chronic pain develop an OUD
  • An estimated 4-6% who misuse prescription opioids transition to heroin
  • Around 80% of people who use heroin first misused prescription opioids

 

Additionally, a recent study of heroin users in the Chicago metro area identified 3 main paths to heroin use disorder:

 

  • Polydrug use (i.e., simultaneous use of multiple substances) to heroin use
  • Prescription opioid abuse to heroin use, and
  • Cocaine use to heroin use (to “come down“)

 

The actual likelihood of developing an OUD from prescription opioids depends on many factors, including:

 

  • Familial history of substance abuse and addiction
  • Genetics / sex / medical history
  • Type of opioid medication, eg. OxyContin
  • Length of time a person is prescribed opioids, and
  • Length of time afterwards that people continue misusing opioids (whether as prescribed or otherwise).

 

The relationship between prescription opioid abuse and increases in heroin use in the U.S. is constantly under scrutiny, as the substances are part of the same opioid drug category, and overlap in several important ways.

 

Currently available research clearly demonstrates:

 

  • Prescription opioid use is a risk factor for heroin use
  • Heroin use is rare in prescription drug users
  • Prescription opioids and heroin have similar effects, and different risk factors
  • A subset of people who abuse prescription opioids may progress to heroin use
  • Increased drug availability is associated with increased use and overdose
  • Heroin use is driven by its low cost and high availability
  • Emphasis is needed on both prevention and treatment
 

Heroin: Short & Long Term Effects

 

The longer a person uses and abuses heroin is directly linked to the amount of mental and physical damage they can potentially inflict upon their health and wellbeing.

 

Apart from the obvious euphoric high, the short-term and, in particular, the long-term effects of heroin abuse can be severe, causing extensive and permanent damage to vital organs, including the brain, and can lead to a drastically reduced life expectancy.

 

Photo of a desperate woman with her hands on her head

 

Additionally, with the illicit heroin supply now becoming more and more contaminated with the synthetic opioid fentanyl and similar substances, the greater is the likelihood of a potentially fatal heroin overdose.

 

Short-Term Effects of Heroin Use

  • Euphoric high (3-5 hours)
  • Decrease in pupil size
  • Decreased heart rate
  • Reduced respiration*
  • Diminished cognition
  • Flushed skin
  • Nausea
  • Vomiting
  • Runny nose
  • Extreme fatigue
  • Dry mouth
  • Heavy limbs
  • Appetite loss
  • Severe itching
  • Drowsiness

 

*Important: Reduced respiration (or slow breathing rate) is of particular concern. Sometimes this can lead to the heroin user falling into a coma, or even suffering irreparable brain damage.

 

Long-Term Effects of Heroin Use

 

The long-term use and abuse of heroin impacts the entire physical body, causing severe and long-standing conditions related to the vital organs.

 

This includes the human brain and a number of its important functions, where the damage done by heroin is often irreversible.

 

Heroin & The Brain

 

Repeated heroin use and abuse changes both the physical structure and the physiology of the brain, creating long-term imbalances in neuronal and hormonal systems that are difficult to reverse.

 

These types of brain damage and functional impairment can include:

 

  • Structural changes to the brain’s reward center
  • Decreased control over the respiratory system, resulting in shallow, slow or irregular breathing
  • Low intake of oxygen, leading to reduced function in the vital organs and possibly organ damage, including the brain itself
  • Reduction in white matter, which can affect decision-making, the regulation of behavior, and normal and healthy responses to stressful situations
  • Dementia-like syndrome, similar to Alzheimer’s disease
  • Severe cognitive impairment 

 

Heroin, particularly over an extended period, will produce profound degrees of tolerance and physical dependence:

 

  • Tolerance results in more and more of the drug being required by the user to achieve the same effects. 
  • Physical dependence is when the body adapts to the constant presence of the drug. Severe and rapid withdrawal symptoms occur if the heroin use is abruptly reduced or stopped entirely.
 

Heroin & The Body

 

In addition to the various forms of damage to the brain, the long-term effects of heroin use, including the sharing of unsterilized needles and other drug paraphernalia, can cause the following bodily damage:

 

  • Liver disease
  • Kidney disease
  • Heart infections
  • Miscarriage
  • Rheumatological issues
  • Pulmonary infections
  • Depression
  • Arthritis
  • Diminished sex drive
  • Skin abscesses and infections
  • Collapsed veins
  • Chronic constipation
  • Infertility (in women)
  • HIV / Hepatitis
  • Other blood-borne viruses


Heroin: Use or Abuse, Addiction & Overdose Risks

 

A recreational heroin user who can literally take the drug or leave it, and has no clear signs of a dependence on the drug either, is one of the fortunate ones.

 

However, for many others, a hit or two of heroin a day quickly becomes a regular necessity to satisfy their dependence. This is an example of drug abuse and drug dependence, needing a regular “fix” to simply feel normal.

 

From a course of prescribed medication to using an illicit and potent street drug, from your trusted family doctor to the nearest backstreet criminal drug dealer

 

It can get worse, and often does. Without treatment, the next stop is heroin addiction – heroin use disorder.

 

Being addicted to heroin consumes absolutely everything else in your life. It is not just your main focus – it’s your only focus.

 

The addiction is further strengthened by the rapid onset of withdrawal symptoms if a heroin fix doesn’t arrive on time.

 

At this point, there is the distinct possibility the brain is suffering irreversible damage, and the hormonal and neural systems have become so unbalanced it will take years of living heroin-free to repair the damage.

 

Additionally, normal dopamine production is a thing of the past – there is no way that the brain in its current state can produce enough of the organ’s “happy chemical” so the addict feels reasonably normal, let alone the feeling of being happy.

 

Physical Signs of Heroin Use & Abuse

 

There are several signs that indicate that a person has been using heroin on a regular basis in the short-term. They are easy to spot when people know what to look for, and they can include:

 

  • Itchiness
  • Nausea / Vomiting
  • Nervous / Anxious
  • Feeling chilly
  • Poor sleep patterns
  • Return of bodily pain


Physical, Psychological & Social Signs of Heroin Addiction

Physical Signs:

  • Needle track marks (on the arms and elsewhere)
  • Infections at injection sites
  • Experiencing withdrawal symptoms when not using
  • Poor
    Speech
  • Shrunken
    Pupils
  • Shallow
    Breathing
  • Poor sleep
    Pattern / Insomnia
  • Fatigue

Psychological Signs:

  • Continuing heroin use despite knowing the clear health risks
  • Unable to stop using on their own
  • Risky behavior when trying to access a new heroin supply
  • Obsession with heroin
  • Using heroin as “self-medication”
  • Decreased cognition and decision-making
  • Agitation and irritability
  • Memory loss

Social Signs:

  • Isolated from loved ones, family and non-using friends
  • Lack of self-care, eg. untidy appearance
  • Socializing with other heroin users (known or unknown)
  • Struggling with finances / legal issues
  • No activity with normal pastimes
  • Increased tolerance to heroin
  • Being deceptive, eg. stealing and lying
  • Employment issues


The High Risk of Heroin Overdose

 

Opioids were the main catalysts behind the record number of fatal drug overdoses seen during 2020, and, as we stated previously, the risk of overdose has significantly increased with contamination of the normal illegal drug supply by the synthetic opioid fentanyl.

Heroin Overdose Statistics

 

According to historical heroin overdose data from the NIDA:

  • In 1999, the number of heroin overdoses was considered extremely low in the U.S.
  • By around 2013, the issue had worsened and it was estimated 10,000 people in total had died from a heroin overdose
  • This figure continued to increase annually, reaching 15,000 in 2016
  • A significant number of these fatal overdoses were a result of poly drug use (mixing two or more drugs to magnify their effects)
  • In 2019, indicating a stabilization of the issue, there were just over 14,000 fatal heroin overdoses
 

How Can I Identify a Heroin Overdose?

 

A heroin overdose can either occur rapidly – within 10 minutes – or slowly – perhaps 3 hours after the last use, and anywhere in between, time-wise.

However, it is rare for someone to die quickly if they have overdosed on heroin, so there is time for them to be saved if prompt action is taken.

If you suspect someone has overdosed on heroin (or another opioid or powerful drug), call 911 immediately. Additionally, if the person is in possession of the opioid overdose reversal medication, naloxone (described below), immediately use it as directed.

Staying with the person is now paramount, as the emergency services need to be advised of the use of naloxone.

The main signs of a heroin overdose can include:

 

  • Vomiting
  • Muscles limp and unresponsive
  • Respiratory depression
  • Skin coloration
  • Purplish lips and fingernails
  • Loss of consciousness
  • Small pupils
  • Inability to speak / incoherent speech
  • Irregular heart rate

What is Naloxone?

 Naloxone is a medicine that rapidly reverses an opioid overdose. It is an “opioid antagonist,” meaning it rapidly attaches to opioid receptors, and reverses and blocks the effects of other opioids.

Naloxone can quickly restore normal breathing to a person if their breathing has slowed or stopped – one the main reasons overdoses can become fatal.

However, naloxone has no effect on someone who does not have opioids in their system, and it should not be used as a type of treatment for opioid use disorder (OUD).

Administering Naloxone: Naloxone can be given in a number of ways, depending upon the brand – either as a nasal spray, or as an injection into the muscle, under the skin, or into the veins.

Additional information about opioid overdose response is available here: Substance Abuse and Mental Health Administration’s (SAMHSA) Opioid Overdose Prevention Toolkit.

 

IMPORTANT: The majority of U.S. states now have “Good Samaritan” laws in place (although they can vary from state-to-state). This means those who provide emergency aid to the overdose victim (friends, other drug users, and even bystanders and passers-by) are exempt from any legal proceedings relating to civil liability simply because they helped.

 

Heroin: Detox, Treatment & Recovery

 Anyone who has been clinically diagnosed with a heroin / opioid use disorder (HUD/OUD – heroin addiction), or is experiencing severe issues controlling its use or with negative consequences either physically, mentally, socially or economically should seek professional treatment

Heroin Detox: Withdrawal Symptoms

The safest way to “detox” (the process of detoxification) from heroin is with a professional, medically supervised detox.

Attempting to detox from heroin solely on your own (known as going “cold turkey”) can be exceptionally dangerous as the withdrawal symptoms can be severe, leading to a high risk of medical issues, relapse and, later, overdose.

Remember, a detox will only help a person become heroin-free, without medical risks – and ready for drug rehab. It does nothing to treat the causes of the addiction. The psychological addiction to heroin has to be professionally treated, along with any mental health issues, behavioral problems, or experiences of trauma.

The most common heroin withdrawal symptoms include runny nose, anxiety, stomach cramps and intense cravings
The most common heroin withdrawal symptoms include runny nose, anxiety, stomach cramps and intense cravings
Depending on the severity of the heroin addiction, withdrawal symptoms usually begin within 12 hours of an individual’s last dose of the drug. These can last as long as several weeks, and it is possible to experience them for several months afterwards.

Types of Heroin Detox Programs

People addicted to heroin are usually recommended for Medication-Assisted Treatment or MAT, which involves the use of specific FDA-approved medications for treating opioid addiction. These recommended medications include:
  • Buprenorphine
  • Methadone
  • Suboxone
  • Naltrexone
  • Subutex
The detoxification process normally takes from 7-10 days, but it can take 14 days.

Heroin Addiction Rehab

Heroin use disorder treatment (often known as heroin addiction rehab) provides the next step in the correct treatment of the newly-detoxed individual. Different types of rehab exist, depending on a patient’s medical needs and their individual circumstances. These rehab centers provide a range of evidence-based treatment programs, which include:
  • One-to-One Counseling Therapy
  • Specific Therapies, such as Cognitive Behavior Therapy (CDT)
  • Group Support, and
  • Family Therapy
According to the NIDA, around half of people who enter into substance abuse treatment have co-occurring disorder (also known as dual diagnosis), meaning they also have a mental health issue that is driving their addictive behavior. Co-occurring disorders must be treated simultaneously with the substance addiction in order for people to recover long-term. If these conditions are not treated together, one may result in the return of the other.

Types of Drug Rehab Treatment Programs

There are several types of drug rehab treatment programs available, which include:
GET THE HELP YOU
DESERVE!

Our treatment programs are custom tailored to your specific needs. One phone call is all it takes to start your recovery from drug & alcohol dependency


SpringBoard Recovery Provides Heroin Addiction Treatment

At SpringBoard Recovery, we understand how hard it is to recover from drug addiction, and our intensive outpatient program (IOP) is designed to speak to the unique needs of each client we work with. Personalized treatment plans are provided, as we know everyone has unique and specific needs during recovery. Our holistic approach to treatment includes several types of therapy, as well as therapeutic activities and nutritional counseling. In addition, we can provide Sober Living homes for those who are out-of-state or living in an unsupportive environment.

Learn More about Recovery from Heroin Addiction: Get Help Today

Do you have questions about heroin addiction or getting the right professional treatment? If so, we are always here to help. Please contact us today.

External Sources:

  1. National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA). Heroin Drug Facts. June, 2021. Available at DrugAbuse.gov.
  2. Drug Enforcement Agency (DEA). Drug Fact Sheet: Heroin. June, 2020. Available at DEA.gov.
  3. U.S. National Library of Medicine: “Dopamine.” August, 2021. Available at NLM.NIH.gov.
  4. Binghamton University, New York. Civil War on drugs: Doctoral candidate explores the nation’s first opioid epidemic. August, 2021. Available at Binghamton.edu
  5. U.S. National Library of Medicine: “Heroin.” August, 2021. Available at NLM.NIH.gov.
  6. U.S. National Library of Medicine: “Mu Opioid Receptor.” 2004. Available at NLM.NIH.gov.
  7. National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA). Opioid Overdose Crisis. March, 2021. Available at DrugAbuse.gov.
  8. National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA). Fentanyl. June, 2021. Available at DrugAbuse.gov.
  9. National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA). Misuse of Prescription Drugs Research Report: What classes of prescription drugs are commonly misused? June, 2020. Available at DrugAbuse.gov.
  10. U.S. Department of Health & Human Services: HHS Acting Secretary Declares Public Health Emergency to Address National Opioid Crisis. October, 2017. Available at HHS.gov [Archived Content].
  11. National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA). Overdose Death Rates. January, 2021. Available at DrugAbuse.gov.
  12. U.S. Centers for Disease Control & Prevention (CDC): Provisional Drug Overdose Death Counts” System. August, 2021. Available at CDC.gov.
  13. Alzheimer’s Association. What is Alzheimer’s? 2021. Available at ALZ.org.
  14. HIV.gov. Hepatitis B & C. April, 2020. Available at HIV.gov.
  15. Council of Residency Directors in Emergency Medicine (CORD). Good Samaritan Laws. 2021. Available at CORDEM.org.
  16. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Administration (SAMHSA). Opioid Overdose Prevention Toolkit. 2018. Available at SAMHSA.gov.
  17. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Administration (SAMHSA). Medication-Assisted Treatment. 2021. Available at SAMHSA.gov.
  18. National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA). Comorbidity: Substance Use & Other Mental Disorders. June, 2021. Available at DrugAbuse.gov.
  19. U.S. National Library of Medicine: “Definition of Partial Hospitalization.” August, 2021. Available at NLM.NIH.gov.

We Accept Most Insurance Plans

We're Here to Help. Call Now

© 2021 SpringBoard Recovery Privacy Policy Sitemap
FOLLOW US ON facebook-icon instagram-icon linkedin-icon