Disturbing Facts About the Cost of Addiction

Disturbing Facts About the Cost of Addiction

Disturbing Facts About the Cost of Addiction

Everyone is familiar with the emotional and physiological cost of addiction. No matter what drug you abuse, using any addictive substance causes severe physiological issues, and people who have substance use problems usually have emotional issues that fuel their addictive tendencies. Addiction affects the emotions of the people around the person who is struggling with a substance. However, substance abuse has another type of negative impact that isn't commonly considered. Even a person who is financially well-off can completely ruin their situation by becoming addicted to drugs, and people who were already financially struggling can easily find themselves in dire straits due to their addiction.

How Much Does Drug Addiction Cost?

According to a recent study, 82 percent of individuals with a loved one struggling with substance abuse disorder reported that their friend, partner, or family member experienced negative financial effects due to their addiction. In fact, this study reports that 48 percent of people with substance abuse disorder entirely depleted their bank accounts to pay for drugs. There's one point where the emotional and financial toll of substance abuse disorder truly intersect for the people around an individual who is struggling with addiction. According to this study, 65 percent of people close to a person with substance abuse disorder reported that the struggling individual asked them for money.

Making Ends Meet with Substance Abuse Disorder

A person who is addicted to cocaine, marijuana, or heroin can easily spend $10,000 or more per year to cover the cost of their substance abuse. Keep in mind that most forms of substance abuse make it impossible for an affected person to get or hold down a job. With ordinary avenues for cash out of the picture, a person with substance abuse disorder has to seek other ways to cover the cost of his or her addiction. The first place that most people with substance abuse disorder look for financial help is to family members or other loved ones. In some cases, an addicted person's family may be financially struggling as well, which means that these requests put an untenable burden on an already tight situation. In other instances, the person's family may be relatively well-off, which poses another set of challenges. We all want the people we love to be happy, and the sorry emotional state that a person with substance abuse disorder is in when he or she doesn't have his or her drugs of choice often incentivizes loved ones to provide financial support. Over the long run, however, financial support only makes the problem worse. While a little bit of money today puts off withdrawals until tomorrow, every day that a person with substance abuse disorder avoids treatment raises the overall cost of addiction a little bit higher.

The Inevitable Downward Spiral

When the point comes that loved ones will no longer provide support for their addiction, a person with substance abuse disorder will seek out less wholesome sources of money. In many cases, people with substance abuse disorder start selling drugs; not only does this habit perpetuate the problem, but it often involves people with substance disorder in criminal gangs. With nowhere else to go, some desperate people with substance abuse disorder will feel like prostitution is their only recourse to get drug money. Needless to say, going down this road can be irreversible both emotionally and physiologically, and it's important to provide a person with an addiction problem with another option before it's too late.

Treatment Can Save You from Financial Crisis

In the end, the only choice that will help a person with substance abuse disorder save themselves from financial oblivion is seeking treatment. While it's true that treatment can be somewhat expensive, when compared with the cost of remaining addicted, the price of addiction treatment becomes minimal. During treatment, a person with substance abuse disorder will learn new behaviors that will help them avoid addictive behaviors long after the initial withdrawal symptoms wear off. One of the ways that addiction treatment centers can help people with substance abuse disorder is with financial education. Many people who have been addicted to drugs try to fill the void with impulsive purchases once they become sober. They may pick up habits like gambling, and they may find themselves in similarly desperate financial situations even though they are no longer using drugs. At qualified treatment centers such as SpringBoard Recovery, addiction specialists provide therapy that helps people with substance abuse disorder better understand the reasons why they sought out drugs in the first place. This type of education can help people with substance abuse disorder make the right types of decisions in the long term. Reach out to SpringBoard Recovery today to overcome your drug dependency and save yourself from the incredible financial burden that addiction can impose.